SunshinePHP Developer Conference 2015

Usar espacios de nombres: Lo básico

(PHP 5 >= 5.3.0)

Antes de hablar del uso de los espacios de nombres es importante entender cómo sabe PHP qué elemento del código del espacio de nombre se requiere. Se puede hacer una simple analogía entre los espacios de nombres de PHP y el sistema de ficheros. Existen tres maneras de acceder a un fichero en el sistema de ficheros:

  1. Nombre de fichero relativo como foo.txt. Esto se resuelve con directorioactual/foo.txt donde directorioactual es el directorio actualmente ocupado. Por lo que si el directorio actual es /home/foo, el nombre se resuelve con /home/foo/foo.txt.
  2. Nombre de ruta relativa como subdirectorio/foo.txt. Esto se resuelve con directorioactual/subdirectorio/foo.txt.
  3. Nombre de ruta absoluto como /main/foo.txt. Esto se resuelve con /main/foo.txt.
Se puede aplicar el mismo principio a los elementos del espacio de nombres de PHP. Por ejemplo, se puede hacer referencia a un nombre de una clase de tres maneras:
  1. Nombre no cualificado, o nombre de clase sin prefijo como $a = new foo(); o foo::métodoestático();. Si el espacio de nombres actual es espaciodenombresactual, esto se resuelve con espaciodenombresactual\foo. Si el código es global, no es de espacio de nombres, esto se resuelve con foo. Una advertencia: los nombres no cualificados para funciones y constantes se resolverán con funciones y constantes globales si la función o la constante del espacio de nombres no está definida. Véase Usar espacios de nombres: una alternativa a funciones/constantes globales para más detalles.
  2. Nombre cualificado, o un nombre de clase con prefijo como $a = new subespaciodenombres\foo(); o subespaciodenombres\foo::métodoestático();. Si el espacio de nombres actual es espaciodenombresactual, esto se resuelve con espaciodenombresactual\subespaciodenombres\foo. Si el código es global, no es de espacio de nombres, esto se resuelve con subespaciodenombres\foo.
  3. Nombre completamente cualificado, o un nombre con prefijo con el operador de prefijo global como $a = new \espaciodenombresactual\foo(); o \espaciodenombresactual\foo::métodoestático();. Esto siempre se resuelve con nombre literal especificado en el código, espaciodenombresactual\foo.

Aquí hay un ejemplo de los tres tipos de sintaxis en código real:

fichero1.php

<?php
namespace Foo\Bar\subespaciodenombres;

const 
FOO 1;
function 
foo() {}
class 
foo
{
    static function 
métodoestático() {}
}
?>

fichero2.php

<?php
namespace Foo\Bar;
include 
'fichero1.php';

const 
FOO 2;
function 
foo() {}
class 
foo
{
    static function 
métodoestático() {}
}

/* Nombre no cualificado */
foo(); // se resuelve con la función Foo\Bar\foo
foo::métodoestático(); // se resuelve con la clase Foo\Bar\foo, método métodoestático
echo FOO// se resuelve con la constante Foo\Bar\FOO

/* Nombre cualificado */
subespaciodenombres\foo(); // se resuelve con la función Foo\Bar\subespaciodenombres\foo
subespaciodenombres\foo::métodoestático(); // se resuelve con la clase Foo\Bar\subespaciodenombres\foo,
                                           // método métodoestático
echo subespaciodenombres\FOO// se resuelve con la constante Foo\Bar\subespaciodenombres\FOO
                                  
/* Nombre conmpletamente cualificado */
\Foo\Bar\foo(); // se resuelve con la función Foo\Bar\foo
\Foo\Bar\foo::métodoestático(); // se resuelve con la clase Foo\Bar\foo, método métodoestático
echo \Foo\Bar\FOO// se resuelve con la constante Foo\Bar\FOO
?>

Observe que para acceder a cualquier clase, función o constante globales, se puede usar un nombre completamente cualificado, como \strlen() o \Exception o \INI_ALL.

Ejemplo #1 Acceder a clases, funciones y constantes globales desde un espacio de nombres

<?php
namespace Foo;

function 
strlen() {}
const 
INI_ALL 3;
class 
Exception {}

$a = \strlen('hola'); // llama a la función global strlen
$b = \INI_ALL// accede a la constante global INI_ALL
$c = new \Exception('error'); // instancia a la clase global Exception
?>

add a note add a note

User Contributed Notes 7 notes

up
60
richard at richard-sumilang dot com
6 years ago
Syntax for extending classes in namespaces is still the same.

Lets call this Object.php:

<?php

namespace com\rsumilang\common;

class
Object{
  
// ... code ...
}

?>

And now lets create a class called String that extends object in String.php:

<?php

class String extends com\rsumilang\common\Object{
  
// ... code ...
}

?>

Now if you class String was defined in the same namespace as Object then you don't have to specify a full namespace path:

<?php

namespace com\rsumilang\common;

class
String extends Object
{
  
// ... code ...
}

?>

Lastly, you can also alias a namespace name to use a shorter name for the class you are extending incase your class is in seperate namespace:

<?php

namespace com\rsumilang\util;
use
com\rsumlang\common as Common;

class
String extends Common\Object
{
  
// ... code ...
}

?>

- Richard Sumilang
up
14
Lukas Z
2 years ago
Well variables inside namespaces do not override others since variables are never affected by namespace but always global:
"Although any valid PHP code can be contained within a namespace, only four types of code are affected by namespaces: classes, interfaces, functions and constants. "

Source: "Defining Namespaces"
http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.namespaces.definition.php
up
3
philip dot preisser at arcor dot de
3 years ago
Working with variables can overwrite equal variables in other namespaces

<?php // php5 - package-version : 5.3.5-1ubuntu7.2

   
namespace
   
main
   
{}

    namespace
   
main\sub1
   
{
       
$data = 1;
    }

    namespace
   
main\sub2
   
{
        echo
$data;// 1
       
$data = 2;
    }

    namespace
   
main\sub1
   
{
        echo
$data;// 2
       
$data = 1;
    }

    namespace
    {
        echo
$data;// 1
   
}

?>
up
3
tom at tomwardrop dot com
2 years ago
It seems the file system analogy only goes so far. One thing that's missing that would be very useful is relative navigation up the namespace chain, e.g.

<?php
namespace MyProject {
   class
Person {}
}

namespace
MyProject\People {
    class
Adult extends ..\Person {}
}
?>

That would be really nice, especially if you had really deep namespaces. It would save you having to type out the full namespace just to reference a resource one level up.
up
-1
Franois Vespa
3 years ago
It seems you cannot nest a constant declaration within a if statement

<?php

namespace FOO;

if(eval)
const
BAR=true;

// will throw the following error:
// PHP Parse error:  syntax error, unexpected T_CONST

// instead use:

if(eval)
define('FOO\BAR',true);

?>
up
-6
anon
8 months ago
The namespace hierarchy will normally mirror the directory hierarchy where the class files are located, but this is not a strict requirement. You could, for example, have several class flles with different namespaces in the same directory.
up
-14
kukoman at pobox dot sk
6 years ago
PHP 5.3.0alpha2 (cli)
<?php
//  namespace MyProject\DB;
require 'db.php';

use
MyProject\DB; // fine; same as DB\
use MyProject\DB\Connection as DBC; // fine
use MyProject\DB as HM; // fine
use HM\Connection as DBC2; // class call ends with FATAL!!!

$x = new DBC(); // fine
$y = new HM\Connection(); // fine
$z = new DBC2(); // Fatal error: Class 'HM\Connection' not found
?>
To Top